Tag Archives: broken ankle

Finally, 50 parkruns!

Yesterday, 10th October, 2015, at the 265th Lloyd parkrun, I finally ran my 50th parkrun.

I had originally planned to run this at Lloyd parkrun’s 250th event, back in June, which would have given me an average of one event run for every five we’d held – not a surprising average given my role as Event Director and Volunteer Coordinator – but then I broke my ankle. It’s now 16 weeks since that simple slip on a grassy bank which caused the injury, and it’s only in the last few weeks that I’ve started, very gradually, to run. First a few paces barefoot on grass, then jogging a bit on a 0.5 mile walk to the railway station, when I was slightly late for the train, working up to jogging all the way to or from a railway station 1.5 miles from home, and then during this last week, some longer runs, reaching about parkrun distance.

Putting myself down to be Tail Runner was one way (many might say the only way) to make sure I wouldn’t try to run too fast on this first parkrun back after so long. It felt really, really good to line up with the other runners, to jog along the track, including large parts of the course that I have not seen in four months, to thank the marshals as I passed them, to watch all the runners ahead of me and cheer on the faster runners as they overtook me during the second lap. I even managed to pick up a few bits of litter along the way and deposit them in the bin just before the bowling green, and collect a few route marker arrows to help the marshals (who bring back the arrows once the last runner has passed them).

I finished in a Personal Worst Time of 47:44, but that didn’t matter. It felt FANTASTIC to be running, and it’s wonderful to have finally made it to the 50-club. Of course, now that I’ve seen the new colour for the 250-club T-shirt is a really nice green, I’ve got motivation to run a bit more often. Volunteering-wise, I’ll be at 250 separate occasions before the end of 2015, earning my 25-club volunteering T-shirt ten times over, but it’s taken me since January 2011 to reach 50 parkruns, so it’s going to be a loooong time before I earn a black 100-club T-shirt, never mind a green 250-club shirt to go with the red 50-club shirt and the purple (NOT my favourite colour – I voted for the bright yellow) volunteering T-shirt.

Never mind – I’m running – and parkrunning – again. That’s what’s important.

Stepping out

For the last two weeks I’ve been back at the office rather than working from home, as I am now capable of making the journey in, and I don’t need to keep the bad leg elevated all the time. However, normally I would cycle in, and I’m not yet capable of six miles each way, half of it uphill, so I have to take public transport. Trams and trains, and 50-60 minutes rather than 35-40 minutes door to door, but at least I do have that option. Initially I was taking one crutch, as I was worried that my ankle might get suddenly tired on the journey home (and it did once or twice in the first week), but now I’ve ditched that. My ability to walk has definitely improved, both distance and speed. Additionally, I’ve taken the first tentative steps back towards running.

My first gentle jogging steps were around the edge of the cricket pitch outside the Striders of Croydon clubhouse. First, I walked round it, wearing my ‘Invisible Shoes’ – basically a 4 mm Vibram sole held on with a piece of cord. Then I decided to walk a lap barefoot – it feels so good underfoot, with the closely-mown grass, and there had been a bit of rain so there was a little give in the ground. Part way round I gave into temptation and jogged 20 steps (10 on each foot). It felt great! I walked a bit then jogged the same again. No pain. Twice more I jogged, 20 steps on each foot and still no pain. Grinning, I made myself walk the rest of the way round the pitch and stop.

A week or so later, worried that I was going to miss my train, I found myself jogging a little as I hurried along the pavement. A bit of a shuffling jog, perhaps, but thankfully pain-free.

Saturday morning, after the parkrun results were all sorted, I went for a gentle jog on the sports field. First, three minutes shod (VivoBarefoot Neo – my usual running shoe) then just under two minutes barefoot, stopping the moment I felt a twinge of discomfort in the area around the break.

Today, I walked to and around South Norwood Country Park, with a few short spells of jogging – about 50 paces per leg each time. Although I walked on the grass where I could, quite a bit was on the stony paths, and the sole of my left foot has definitely been a bit uncomfortable during the afternoon, but I’m very pleased to have walked more than two miles – a distance that was totally beyond consideration even a week ago.

Still a long way to go to regain strength, mobility and proprioception, and a lot of foot and leg muscle to re-grow, but hopefully in a few weeks I will be able to walk/jog a parkrun!

Learning to walk

Before you can run, you have to learn to walk. At the moment, I’m re-learning how to walk.

At the Fracture Clinic, six weeks post-op, I was told that, having spent the past seven weeks totally non-weight bearing, I should start partial weight bearing (PWB), wearing the Aircast boot, and progress to fully weight bearing (FWB) in the boot in 7-10 days. Once I’d done that, I was to try without the boot, PWB and aiming to be FWB (i.e. no crutches) within 7-14 days.

That seemed like a very short time to return to walking, and it would have been nice to have some hints HOW to increase weight bearing. I got lots of support from an online discussion group of people with broken ankles/legs, and some good tips from people who had been through this. At three days I thought there was no way I would progress fast enough. At six days I still thought I would be lucky to be walking in the boot by 10 days, but by eight days I was walking short distances with no crutches – amazing.

Now I’m progressing through the “no boot” partial weight bearing. In some ways it’s easier than with the boot: the foot is the correct size not horribly large; the leg is the same length as the other one, not nearly two inches longer; the boot isn’t pressing or rubbing against my ankle bones, so there’s less pain; and my ankle can flex, rather than being held rigid with my foot at 90 degrees to my leg. The  ankle does, however, feel rather vulnerable.

I’ve also had my initial physio assessment. At the Fracture Clinic I had been cleared to start some basic range of motion (ROM) exercises, so I’d been doing those. The physio thought that my ROM and lower leg/foot muscle strength were pretty good, considering. He also really appreciated that I had written out a full clinical history for him, so he didn’t have to spend 20 minutes asking questions to find out what damage I’d done and how far along I was in healing. I’d also taken in printouts of possible exercises, so he could just confirm which ones I was to start doing, rather than having to go into lots of detail describing them and showing them to me. It also helps that most of the exercises are the same as the ones I had to do to regain mobility and strength after my posterior tibial tendon tear.

So, now it’s basically up to me to do the exercises to strengthen the leg and get the ankle moving again, and to reach fully weight bearing without the boot for support.

My motivation is high to progress in the walking: once I can walk properly (and have strengthened the leg up a bit) I can start returning to running!

Back to square one

Three weeks ago I was looking forward to running my 50th parkrun on the Lloyd parkrun 250th event, followed a week later by the Croydon 30 and then to some nice long trail training runs in preparation for Ladybower 50 in September (plus the final running of The Jog Shop Jog 20, plus Beach Head Marathon, plus…).

Then I walked down a damp grassy bank while talking with a colleague, my left foot slipped and I fell. The foot went sideways with all my weight on it. It hurt.

I was non-weight-bearing immediately but thought/hoped I had a bad sprain. Unfortunately, X-ray showed that I’d broken my ankle (in more technical terms, I had a Weber B fracture of the lateral malleolus (distal fubula) with some displacement and some disruption of the joint space).

To say I was gutted is an understatement. I’d just got back to decent long runs and being able to really enjoy my running without worrying about my ankle, after the cycling accident that tore my left posterior tibial tendon three days after Ladybower 50 in 2013 and here I was, right back to square one.

A week after the accident I had surgery (open reduction, internal fixation) to repair it. I don’t yet know what hardware has been put in place; I should find out next week when I see the surgeon again.

Yesterday I had my first day without pain or serious discomfort – not from the break itself, but from the cast and the swelling. It made a nice change.

I also tried for the first time my “iwalk 2.0”. This is basically a high-tech peg-leg with a padded shelf facing backwards on which your injured lower leg rests. You adjust it to fit, strap yourself in… and walk! It’s amazing. I’m going to be careful not to use it too much, because I’m still having some circulation issue (associated, I think, with bruising and swelling due to oedema (fluid in the tissues) under the cast, but it is so nice to be able to stand and to use my hands while standing.

Official timetable for recovery, if all goes well, is:

  • Six weeks in a cast and non-weightbearing following the surgery (one week down, five to go, I hope);
  • Six weeks after that of rehabilitation – physio, exercises, gradually increasing partial weight-bearing and then full weight-bearing.

After that, hopefully, I will be able to start trying to run short distances and, if all goes well, start working up the distances. Again.