Tag Archives: Injury

Not-running Comrades

At the end of May I flew from the UK to South Africa, via Dubai, to not-run Comrades.

It was a decidedly bitter-sweet experience, given that I had been training for Comrades since November last year, but I’m very glad that I went.

Why was I not running? Injury, or a series of unfortunate events: I broke my left ankle last June, got running again, worked up to a 26-mile run by Christmas and an official marathon, qualifying me for Comrades, in January. Then I got some back pain from too much sitting in a badly-fitting office chair, then a groin niggle, which I thought was referred from my back… but which turned out to be (or at least partially be) from pelvic malalignment related to decreased flexibility in the broken ankle

At 16 miles into the London Marathon I found myself suddenly unable to lift my right leg and run – I walked the remaining 10 miles, slowly and with a heavy limp. An x-ray three days later showed that I had stress-fractured a pubic ramus on my right side, which would mean no running for eight weeks if I was lucky or as long as eight months or more if I was unlucky and/or didn’t rest it properly. Running a 56-mile hilly road ultra five weeks later was not going to happen.

Since I had paid for my flights months earlier, and wanted to meet a number of people I’d been chatting to online, I decided to go anyway: even if it did mean about 18 hours of travelling in each direction for four days in South Africa. I packed carefully for the trip, including NOT packing my running shoes, so as to avoid any last-minute temptation to actually start the race. Despite knowing that I would not be running, the pre-race excitement on-line in the UK Runner’s World Comrades thread had my heart rate increasing in the days before my flights out.

Travelling to Comrades was an experience in itself: gradually joining up with other runners: first spotting one or two other runners on the flight from Gatwick to Dubai (the running T-shirts gave it away), then many more runners some with running shoes dangling from hand luggage, gradually drifted into the waiting area for the flight from Dubai to Durban. During the flight I decided the passengers probably had the lowest average BMI and highest average fitness level of any set of passengers on an airplane!

I would never have deliberately set out to travel all the way to South Africa to watch other people running Comrades, but I’m very glad I went. I got to meet lots of friends I had previously known only online, as well as make some totally new friends. I got to take part in the record breaking parkrun at North Beach (1,872 finishers), meet Ari Searlis there and get him to sign my copy of my book on the page where he’s mentioned; meet up with Bruce and Gill Fordyce again. I got to enjoy wandering around the expo during Saturday without having to just rest before the race;  I got to experience the start of the race, and learn that a small flashlight (pitch black inside the portaloos!) as well as toilet paper will be important when I finally get to do the Down run. Spending the day in the stadium, watching and taking photos, was fun and I had a further day of enjoyable socialisation with other runners before we all departed.

Leaving South Africa was a reverse of the journey out there, with a multitude of runners, many in their new Comrades T-shirts, on the flight to Dubai, and what felt like a very abrupt parting as we all dispersed through the huge Dubai airport, off to different flights home.

Not-running Comrades was a good experience. But hopefully, with a careful return to running, next year I’ll be having an even better experience, running it.

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Finally, 50 parkruns!

Yesterday, 10th October, 2015, at the 265th Lloyd parkrun, I finally ran my 50th parkrun.

I had originally planned to run this at Lloyd parkrun’s 250th event, back in June, which would have given me an average of one event run for every five we’d held – not a surprising average given my role as Event Director and Volunteer Coordinator – but then I broke my ankle. It’s now 16 weeks since that simple slip on a grassy bank which caused the injury, and it’s only in the last few weeks that I’ve started, very gradually, to run. First a few paces barefoot on grass, then jogging a bit on a 0.5 mile walk to the railway station, when I was slightly late for the train, working up to jogging all the way to or from a railway station 1.5 miles from home, and then during this last week, some longer runs, reaching about parkrun distance.

Putting myself down to be Tail Runner was one way (many might say the only way) to make sure I wouldn’t try to run too fast on this first parkrun back after so long. It felt really, really good to line up with the other runners, to jog along the track, including large parts of the course that I have not seen in four months, to thank the marshals as I passed them, to watch all the runners ahead of me and cheer on the faster runners as they overtook me during the second lap. I even managed to pick up a few bits of litter along the way and deposit them in the bin just before the bowling green, and collect a few route marker arrows to help the marshals (who bring back the arrows once the last runner has passed them).

I finished in a Personal Worst Time of 47:44, but that didn’t matter. It felt FANTASTIC to be running, and it’s wonderful to have finally made it to the 50-club. Of course, now that I’ve seen the new colour for the 250-club T-shirt is a really nice green, I’ve got motivation to run a bit more often. Volunteering-wise, I’ll be at 250 separate occasions before the end of 2015, earning my 25-club volunteering T-shirt ten times over, but it’s taken me since January 2011 to reach 50 parkruns, so it’s going to be a loooong time before I earn a black 100-club T-shirt, never mind a green 250-club shirt to go with the red 50-club shirt and the purple (NOT my favourite colour – I voted for the bright yellow) volunteering T-shirt.

Never mind – I’m running – and parkrunning – again. That’s what’s important.

Learning to walk

Before you can run, you have to learn to walk. At the moment, I’m re-learning how to walk.

At the Fracture Clinic, six weeks post-op, I was told that, having spent the past seven weeks totally non-weight bearing, I should start partial weight bearing (PWB), wearing the Aircast boot, and progress to fully weight bearing (FWB) in the boot in 7-10 days. Once I’d done that, I was to try without the boot, PWB and aiming to be FWB (i.e. no crutches) within 7-14 days.

That seemed like a very short time to return to walking, and it would have been nice to have some hints HOW to increase weight bearing. I got lots of support from an online discussion group of people with broken ankles/legs, and some good tips from people who had been through this. At three days I thought there was no way I would progress fast enough. At six days I still thought I would be lucky to be walking in the boot by 10 days, but by eight days I was walking short distances with no crutches – amazing.

Now I’m progressing through the “no boot” partial weight bearing. In some ways it’s easier than with the boot: the foot is the correct size not horribly large; the leg is the same length as the other one, not nearly two inches longer; the boot isn’t pressing or rubbing against my ankle bones, so there’s less pain; and my ankle can flex, rather than being held rigid with my foot at 90 degrees to my leg. The  ankle does, however, feel rather vulnerable.

I’ve also had my initial physio assessment. At the Fracture Clinic I had been cleared to start some basic range of motion (ROM) exercises, so I’d been doing those. The physio thought that my ROM and lower leg/foot muscle strength were pretty good, considering. He also really appreciated that I had written out a full clinical history for him, so he didn’t have to spend 20 minutes asking questions to find out what damage I’d done and how far along I was in healing. I’d also taken in printouts of possible exercises, so he could just confirm which ones I was to start doing, rather than having to go into lots of detail describing them and showing them to me. It also helps that most of the exercises are the same as the ones I had to do to regain mobility and strength after my posterior tibial tendon tear.

So, now it’s basically up to me to do the exercises to strengthen the leg and get the ankle moving again, and to reach fully weight bearing without the boot for support.

My motivation is high to progress in the walking: once I can walk properly (and have strengthened the leg up a bit) I can start returning to running!

Dreaming of Running

It’s now more than six weeks since I broke my ankle, five since the fractured fibula was fixed surgically, and I’m counting down the days (four!) until my six-week post-op check-up. I am really, really hoping that the x-rays will show good bone healing. If they do, I will be allowed to start partial weight bearing and what should be a six week rehabilitation period to return to normal walking, if all goes well. For the moment, all I can do is wiggle my toes, GENTLY move my foot forwards and backwards in a straight line, and a few leg exercises, while wearing the Aircast boot, to try to maintain some of my upper leg muscles, even if my calf muscles are horribly wasted.

By day, I sit on my sofa, leg propped up on pillows, sofa and coffee table converted into a temporary home office, getting my work done.

By night I lie with my leg well propped up on pillows, and I dream of running: parkrunning, woodland trail running, even road running. Occasionally I dream that I’ve got out of bed and walked across the room, and then I remember I’m not allowed to do that yet and I wake up feeling guilty – then realise I didn’t actually do it!

I am thoroughly fed up of spending 14 hours a day sitting on the sofa, even if it is quite a comfortable sofa. Thankfully, my wonderful husband has given up his Saturday morning lie-ins in order to take me to Lloyd parkrun. As during my other periods of injury-enforced breaks from running, volunteering at Lloyd parkrun has been the highlight of each week.

The first week, the only role I dared take was barcode scanning, meaning that I only needed to get from the car past the cafe to the registartion tables, then sit down. However, as the pain has reduced and I’ve become more mobile on my crutches, I’ve managed to get as far as the finish chute to be (while sitting down) photographer or timer, and (again with my husband’s assistance for juggling megaphone and crutch) even Run Director. Everyone has been very supportive, with Jenny Booth taking on Run Director most weeks and number Checker even the time I was Run Director. I’m hoping to be mobile enough to try that as well, soon.

I’ve also managed to volunteer for a couple of events associated with my running club, Striders of Croydon, including the local veteran’s league athletics match two weeks ago and our club handicap last Wednesday. Good to be out and about, and socialising with people, and able to DO something.

Many thanks to Stuart and to Selena, for transportation on those two occasions.

Three weeks…

It’s now three weeks since my fractured fibula was plated. Just another three weeks to go until my next appointment at the hospital. Hopefully the radiographs (x-rays) then will show that the bone has mended appropriately and I will be cleared to start rehabiitation.

The intra-operative x-rays showed that the plate holding the bone nicely in place, with the ankle joint space even (good, as it hadn’t been in the pics taken the day after the fracture – it had been wider on the medial (inner) side), and that the syndesmosis – the attachment between the fibula and the larger lower leg bone, the tibia, was intact (also good).

I’m presently wearing an Aircast boot rather than a cast. The surgeon allowed me to switch to this with the STRICT instruction from him, and promises from me, that I wouldn’t try any weightbearing on the foot until the end of the six week post-op period (and then only if the x-rays say it’s safe to do so). However, I can very gently move my foot up and down and start the joint moving a bit, which is a bonus.

The biggest advantage, and the main reason I asked for the boot, is that I can take the boot OFF so long as I can keep the leg raised up and supported, on cushions or pillows. This is a huge thing for me, because I have problems with a condition called allodynia. Basically, steady pressure on my ankle bones, my Achilles’ tendon, or the top of my foot gets translated into pain by my nervous system. Rather a problem when you’re wearing a cast putting pressure onto those areas all the time. A week after the op I was given a fiberglass cast with a strip about an inch wide taken out the front so I could lever the cast open a bit to take the pressure off my anle bones when necessary (which I had to do several times a day). Being able to actually remove it is much better!

The biggest disadvantage is the the boot is large and heavy – much heavier than the fiberglass cast was, so carrying it about is more work. Less pain makes that well worthwhile.

I’m also much better on the crutches than I was before; I’ve even been out watering the tomato plants, herbs and potatoes – with great care not to get tangled in the hose.

Three weeks also makes it 21 injections into my abdominal area done and 21 to go. Another fun experience (not), although I like the idea of deep vein thrombosis even less, so I keep going with the injections. It will be so nice when I can stop doing this to myself each day.

So, 21 more days, then I sincerely hope the radiographs will show good bone healing and I’ll be able to start the rehabilitation period. Just three more weeks…

Back to square one

Three weeks ago I was looking forward to running my 50th parkrun on the Lloyd parkrun 250th event, followed a week later by the Croydon 30 and then to some nice long trail training runs in preparation for Ladybower 50 in September (plus the final running of The Jog Shop Jog 20, plus Beach Head Marathon, plus…).

Then I walked down a damp grassy bank while talking with a colleague, my left foot slipped and I fell. The foot went sideways with all my weight on it. It hurt.

I was non-weight-bearing immediately but thought/hoped I had a bad sprain. Unfortunately, X-ray showed that I’d broken my ankle (in more technical terms, I had a Weber B fracture of the lateral malleolus (distal fubula) with some displacement and some disruption of the joint space).

To say I was gutted is an understatement. I’d just got back to decent long runs and being able to really enjoy my running without worrying about my ankle, after the cycling accident that tore my left posterior tibial tendon three days after Ladybower 50 in 2013 and here I was, right back to square one.

A week after the accident I had surgery (open reduction, internal fixation) to repair it. I don’t yet know what hardware has been put in place; I should find out next week when I see the surgeon again.

Yesterday I had my first day without pain or serious discomfort – not from the break itself, but from the cast and the swelling. It made a nice change.

I also tried for the first time my “iwalk 2.0”. This is basically a high-tech peg-leg with a padded shelf facing backwards on which your injured lower leg rests. You adjust it to fit, strap yourself in… and walk! It’s amazing. I’m going to be careful not to use it too much, because I’m still having some circulation issue (associated, I think, with bruising and swelling due to oedema (fluid in the tissues) under the cast, but it is so nice to be able to stand and to use my hands while standing.

Official timetable for recovery, if all goes well, is:

  • Six weeks in a cast and non-weightbearing following the surgery (one week down, five to go, I hope);
  • Six weeks after that of rehabilitation – physio, exercises, gradually increasing partial weight-bearing and then full weight-bearing.

After that, hopefully, I will be able to start trying to run short distances and, if all goes well, start working up the distances. Again.